Real Tombs of the Pharaohs
Photo of the Valley of the Kings near Aswan, Egypt.

Photo of the Giza Plateau; typical pyramid complex.
Photo of the entrance to many royal tombs. It makes more sense to me that the ancient Egyptians buried their royalty in the side of a mountain along with all of their possessions and royal treasures. After they were buried the entrance was covered up.

An example of the interior of a royal tomb. Note the finely detailed drawings.

An example of the interior of a pyramid. No drawings on the bare walls. (Hand rails were added recently for safety.)
Example of the interior of a royal tomb. Everything-the walls, ceilings and so forth-are brightly painted.

Example of the interior of a pyramid. No paintings on the walls.
Example of the interior of a royal tomb.

Example of the interior of a pyramid.
An example of an interior of a tomb. it should be obvious by now that there is a distinct difference between pyramids and tombs.

Photo of a typical pyramid. Note air vent with burn stains in the red circle.
An example of the interior of a tomb. Tombs have no air vents.

An example of the interior of a pyramid.
Drawing of a cross section of a royal tomb carefully cut into solid bed rock. It angles down over 200 feet. Every square inch is covered in detailed paintings. The entrance is at the right side, in the red circle.

If the pyramids were not tombs, what were they? I believe that they were large tools or factories. They had water coursing through them for some reason. (This can be proven by mineral samples examined from the various passageways and chambers.)
Continue To: Samples Examined to Verify Past Presence of Water
Back to: Typical Pyramids Built in Egypt
2007 Earthmilk Ancient Energy